Eviction ban extended further

On the 8th of January, it was announced that the ban on evictions already in place for England was to be extended for a further 6 weeks. The ban was due to end 3 days after this latest extension announcement.;
Eviction

On the 8th of January, it was announced that the ban on evictions already in place for England was to be extended for a further 6 weeks.

The current ban was due to end just 3 days before the announcement on the 11th of January.

UK extensions

This follows Scotland’s announcement on the 7th to extend their eviction ban until late March.

Wales will follow suit with an extension until the 31st of March.

UK Housing Secretary, Robert Jenrick announced that the ban would be extended until February 21st “at least” when it will likely be reviewed again.

The original ban, introduced during the first national lockdown in March 2020, has since been extended three times previously, the last of which was announced in September.

What does this mean?

Unlike the first national lockdown, the courts are currently able to process cases and eviction notices can be issued.

However, bailiffs are unable to enact them until 22nd of February at the earliest, except in extreme cases such as anti-social behaviour, such as cases involving domestic abuse.

With the ban coming to an end in January, some landlords would have been preparing to get their properties back.

Mark Hayward, chief policy advisor for Propertymark highlights how this last-minute decision could be affecting landlords.

“Over the past few weeks the UK government has held off updates about evictions to the sector making it impossible for agents to respond and plan for the difficult winter months ahead.”

“The whole of the private rented sector has been impacted as a result of COVID-19 but we must recognise that the courts already faced a backlog of cases prior to the pandemic.”

NRLA’s concerns

Ben Beadle, chief executive of the National Residential Landlords Association (NRLA) commented

“The repossessions ban is a sticking plaster that will ultimately lead to more people losing their homes. It means tenants’ debts will continue to mount to the point where they have no hope of paying them off leading eventually to them having to leave their home.

“Instead the Government should recognise the crisis facing many tenants and take immediate action to enable them to pay their debts as is happening in Scotland and Wales. The objective should be to sustain tenancies in the long term and not just the short term.”

This information should not be interpreted as financial advice. Mortgage and loan rates are subject to change.